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  • Yusuke N.

ヒガラ・ウグイスなど / Coal tit, Japanese bush warbler, etc.

I went to a forest park in the north hiroshima area. It was very windy that day and there were not many wild birds in the park. At any rate, I took a walk. The equipment was D500 + AF-S NIKKOR 500mm f/5.6E. I realized that this is the best combination for my style of walking around and shooting.


The background is a mess, and there is nothing creative about the composition, but this is a coal tit. He was very curious and friendly, and came closer and closer to me. I don't know if birds have expressions, but I like the way he was looking at me with great interest.

ヒガラ / Coal tit
Nikon D500 + AF-S NIKKOR 500mm f/5.6E PF ED VR

It jumped out further, hovered in front of the lens hood, and then left. It seemed to be interested in the lens and the shutter sound.

ヒガラ / Coal tit
Nikon D500 + AF-S NIKKOR 500mm f/5.6E PF ED VR

I found a Japanese bush warbler in the bushes. The area around this one was a bit of a mess, but the spotlight was impressive.

ウグイス / Japanese bush warbler
Nikon D500 + AF-S NIKKOR 500mm f/5.6E PF ED VR

I switched to the D750 + Tamron SP 90mm F/2.8 Di MACRO and took some pictures in the forest. Nothing really caught my eye, but I wanted to take interesting pictures somehow, even in this situation.

放射状に広がる葉 / Radial pattern of leaves
Nikon D750 + Tamron SP 90mm F/2.8 Di MACRO 1:1 VC USD

裏から照らされる枯れ葉 / Withered leaves lit from back
Nikon D750 + Tamron SP 90mm F/2.8 Di MACRO 1:1 VC USD

What I wanted to photograph was not the tree branch... but the insects above. The result is nothing to write home about.

小さな羽虫 / Gnats
Nikon D750 + Tamron SP 90mm F/2.8 Di MACRO 1:1 VC USD

What was interesting was the image of this insect, which was taken at 1/90th of a second, so the subject was blurred. As a result, the trajectory of its flapping wings is beautifully preserved. It looks like the insects in "Nausicaa," but it's just a blur. When I counted the number of blurs, I found that there were usually five in a row. In other words, there are five flaps per 1/90th of a second, or 450 flaps per second. So what's the point, you might say, but isn't it an amazing speed?

It was an interesting discovery, even if it was rejected as a photographic work.

小さな羽虫 / Gnats
Nikon D750 + Tamron SP 90mm F/2.8 Di MACRO 1:1 VC USD

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